Posts Tagged ‘Windows’

Extracting Zip Files using PowerShell

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

To help troubleshoot some SharePoint issues, I had a need to analyze some log files that were contained in multiple zip files; one log file per zip file. Since there were several hundred zip files to extract, I figured PowerShell could help! There are several posts I found with example scripts for how to perform this operation. I took pieces from many posts, added some COM object clean-up code, and wrapped this in a function. I hope it helps you in your scripting activities!

The code below is the function I’m using to extract a single zip file. It leverages the Windows Shell COM object (i.e. Windows Explorer) to extract the files by exploiting the fact that Windows Explorer treats zip files as folders. Therefore, the operation can leverage existing file copy methods between two folders.

Access Denied when Enabling PowerShell Remoting

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

Quick tip: Are you receiving Access Denied messages when you are attempting to run the Enable-PSRemoting cmdlet? I’ve received them on machines connected to a domain, even when I’m running in an elevated PowerShell window. An easy trick is to open a PowerShell window as the built-in administration account on the machine. Not sure why, but for whatever reason, it seems to work!

VirtualBox Unidentified Network

Thursday, February 2nd, 2012

Thanks to Oisin Grehan and his Nivot Ink blog for providing the foundation of this post!
VMWare VMNET Adapters Triggering Public Profile for Windows Firewall


I use Oracle’s VirtualBox to run x64 SharePoint virtual machines from my laptop. I’ve also noticed an Unidentified Network in my Windows 7 list of networks. That is caused by VirtualBox’s Host-Only Network Adapter. It wasn’t harming anything at the time so I left it alone.

However, I later attempt to enable PowerShell remoting on my host laptop for work with SharePoint scripting. Upon doing so, I was greeted with the following error message while attempting the Enable-PSRemoting cmdlet:

Set-WSManQuickConfig : WinRM firewall exception will not work since one of the network connection types on this machine is set to Public. Change the network connection type to either Domain or Private and try again.

Another helpful error message! That seems easy enough; Windows makes it very easy to modify the settings for each individual network adapter to Private, Work, or Public depending on your personal preference. However, this is not the case with an unidentified network. With an unidentified network, Windows sticks to its Public settings and will not change it.

So can I now not enable PowerShell remoting since I can’t remove the Public designation of VirtualBox’s unidentified network? No! VirtualBox’s Host-Only network isn’t really a true network connection at all. It is an endpoint adapter. Kudos to Oisin Grehan for developing a nice PowerShell script that will solve the issue by telling Windows, via the registry, that the network adapter is an endpoint device and not a true external network connection. This will cause Windows to stop treating the VirtualBox Host-Only adapter as a network and thus remove the unidentified network (and its public designation) from my list of networks. Problem solved! I’ve modified Oisin’s script to account for VirtualBox’s Host-Only instead of VMware adapters.

Note: This script will need to be executed every time VirtualBox is updated because the update will replace the existing adapter and cause the settings in the registry to be lost.

Moving an Event Source to a Different Windows Event Log

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2011

It is typically best practice when developing .NET applications, including SharePoint customizations, to create an event source for Windows Event Logging while installing the application. Each event source on a Windows computer is tied to a specific log upon registration. I recently provided guidance on how to move an event source to use its own brand new event log. The following lines of PowerShell can do this quickly. Unless your .NET application has the event log hardcoded into itself, which it shouldn’t because the event source should be registered to a log during installation, then the move shouldn’t require any code changes.

I found that I had to reboot the machine after executing the above lines of PowerShell for this change to fully take effect.

Update – I also have had the need to update the event log properties. To do so, use the Limit-EventLog cmdlet. The following code limits the MyNewOrExistingWindowsEventLog event log to a size of 20 MB (20*1024*1024 or 20,971,520 bytes) and tells Windows to overwrite old entries with new entries as needed.